hjertnes.blog

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15.10.2018 06:41

Liked: Daniel Radcliffe and the Art of the Fact-Check | The New Yorker

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15.10.2018 06:41

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15.10.2018 06:41

Liked: Syntax Synonyms

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15.10.2018 06:41

Liked: Test av Sbankens APIer

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13.10.2018 12:05

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13.10.2018 12:05

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13.10.2018 12:05

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13.10.2018 12:05

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13.10.2018 12:05

Liked: I switched to Fuji

Emacs Getting started

12.10.2018 10:00

There are many ways to start, and I’m not sure what is the best place to do so. For many people I think the best way in is through a good plug and play config system like prelude or spacemacs. Then I recommend starting with evil, if you are a vim user, but giving the default keybindings a shot at some point. I also recommend to try moving over to your own config at some point, because it gives you a lot of options that for example spacemacs can’t give you.

It is also a lot easier to figure out what is wrong if you’re using plain emacs. Not to mention the speed.

For resources for learning emacs I think the GNU resources Emacs and Elisp manuals plus their tutorials and getting started guides are great. I also think the book “Mastering Emacs” is awesome.

If you have some time and patience, I do think using the config sample I shared and making your own thing is the best way to learn the most in the shortest amount of time. I never learnt more about emacs than when I started with my own config