Hjertnes.blog

Macdrifter

August 10, 2015

Macdrifter:

Ghostery is a browser plugin available for Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Opera and it dramatically speeds up the web. Ok, that’s not the goal of Ghostery, but it’s a major benefit. Ghostery blocks calls to web servers that it knows are ad or tracking networks. Some would call it an ad-blocker. I call it a drain unclogger. It prevents Web pages from making additional calls out to known bad actors. It prevents a Web site from hijacking your own browser to track you

I’m not a fan of Ad blockers, because I believe that Ads are a fair trade when you don’t pay for the content. But I’m not okay with trackers. And Ghostery is a great way to avcoid trackers on Windows and OS X.

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Moving From Google Calendar – Every Second Weekend

August 10, 2015

Over the past week, I have sat down in the evenings Google Calendar open and my new leather diary on the desk and copied all of my Google Calendar entries into the paper diary. Since spending some time on this task I now put the diary in my work bag every day having it with me allows me the ability to easily flick to a particular day and see exactly what is happening, from here I can schedule blog posts, life events, write notes and plan my days with Little Miss, for me having an actual diary to flick through is a much better solution than Google Calendar, I am not saying that Google Calendar is by any means a bad thing especially when it comes to sharing your events with loved ones or colleagues but for me it just wasn’t working anymore. I am still using Google Calendar for important reminders, but appointments and life events have a new home in my diary.

I moved away from my digital iCloud + Fantastical a few months ago. My [Hobonichi Planner] is exactly what I need, without all the noise of a digital calendar, and it works without internet, and electricity.

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Non-Google analytics – All this

August 10, 2015

I still use GA, I’m not 100% sure. But the thing I’m looking for is an alternative from a company that does one thing — analytics. I would not mind paying for it, if it’s good.

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512 Pixels review of Apple Watch

August 04, 2015

Stephen Hackett:

As I said over 2,800 words ago, I’m conflicted when it comes to thinking about Apple Watch.

I’d recommend it to anyone who is strongly tied to their iPhone and is looking for something to track their fitness.

Great review, and I can never make up my mind and write something about the Apple Watch.

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iOS Game

August 04, 2015

I saw this game on the front page of the iOS App Store the other day. The concept itself it kind of weird, but it is a fantastic game. It is easy enough to get a hold of within seconds, and just hard enough to keep you interested.

I love beautiful and unique games.

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The Pen Addict

August 03, 2015

Great review of my favourite planner. I use my every single day to plan short term, long term and to keep a log of the highlevel stuff I was working on.

I use the Hobonichi Planner, since it is the only one available in English, but I would consider the others if or when they are available in English.

You can use them for many different things. Some people use them as a log, while others use them to journal, and of cource planning.

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Don’t order the fish – Marco.org

July 30, 2015

Marco:

With the introduction of Apple Music, Apple confusingly introduced a confusing service backed by the iTunes Store that’s confusingly integrated into iTunes and the iOS Music app (don’t even get me started on that) and partially, maybe, mostly replaces the also very confusing and historically unreliable iTunes Match.

So iTunes is a toxic hellstew of technical cruft and a toxic hellstew of UI design, in the middle of a transition between two partly redundant cloud services, both of which are confusing and vague to most people about which songs of theirs are in the cloud, which are safe to delete, and which ones they actually have.

Even Jim’s follow-up piece, after meeting privately with Apple in PR-damage-control mode, is confusing at best about what actually might have happened, which is completely understandable because it sounds like even Apple isn’t sure.

I have plenty of plausible theories on why iTunes didn’t get the iCloud Photos treatment --- why Apple Music was bolted onto this ancient, crufty, legacy app instead of discontinuing iTunes, dropping its obsolete functions, and starting fresh with a new app and a CloudKit-based service. (Engineering resources, time to market, iPods, Windows, and people with slow internet connections.)

Exactly.

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I got my music back. At least most of it

July 30, 2015

It is good to see that Jim got back most of his music. While I acknowledge that Apple are trying to solve something very difficult, I believe that they haven’t done a good enough job on explaining how everything works.

Everyone: remember to back up your stuff.

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Improvement — Liss is More

July 30, 2015

Casey Liss:

I’m pretty pleased with myself.

I didn’t set out wanting to take a great picture in manual mode; I just set out to take a great picture. Since I’ve been taking pictures with this camera for nearly a year now, I’ve built up more and more confidence over that time. Thanks to just being patient, and trusting my instincts, I was able to, well, level up my skills.

As it turns out, there’s no shortcut to lots of practice, and time.

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9to5Mac

July 28, 2015

Interesting piece about why Mike Beasley still jailbreaks his phone.

I have jailbroken phones and iPads in the past, and it isn’t for me. But I do get why some people prefer it.

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